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 MEMORIES OF MY EARLY LIFE IN TREDEGAR.
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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13780 Posts

Posted - 23/08/2007 :  22:19:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bryan Rendell has sent in some memory's of his childhood growing up in Tredegar. Thanks to him for a fascinating insight.

________________________________________________________________________

MEMORIES OF MY EARLY LIFE IN TREDEGAR.

From a very early age I can remember my Tredegar.
In 1936 my parents moved to Pembroke Dock. My father, who was a blacksmith was out of work from Tredegar Iron Works and my mother’s family arranged to rent a little shop in Bufferland for my parents.
When Ebbw Vale Steelworks was being built my father applied for a job and we moved back to Tredegar in early 1939. He bought a house – No. 6 Mafeking Terrace, and it was here that many of my early happy memories are recalled.

I can remember quite clearly my mother saying, when the news was broadcast on the wireless, that Britain was at war with Germany – ‘now we are for it’. She and my father had lived through WW1.
My grandparents lived at No. 30 Mafeking Terrace, my grandfather having the house built by Dai. Bowen in 1902, so I used to live in both houses.

My grandfather worked in the pits and I can remember him coming home black as soot to a bath already prepared by my grandmother. The huge fire was roaring Winter and Summer and quite a lot of the neighbours would be talking to my grandmother whilst my grandfather bathed. When he was clean he would soap up his face and bring out the open razor and strop and shave. I can still hear the rasp of the razor on his face.

I was always intrigued at the blue marks on my grandfather’s hands and head, from cuts on the workface filled up with coal dust. He also had a jagged blue cut on one of his legs. This occurred in Farrington Gurney when he was 14 years of age. He was working in the pits there and got caught in a fall. He was taken home to his grandmother who sewed his leg up with needle and cotton – and we think we are tough today.

I loved my grandfather and used to roll his twist for him. Twist was a black tobacco stick that had to be cut, rolled for a pipe, but underground in the pits the miners chewed it to keep the dust from getting into their lungs.

My grandfather kept chickens at the top of the garden and I used to collect the eggs on a daily basis. On special occasions he would kill a bird and we would sit down to a special meal.
My father worked long hours from 1939 onwards and my mother and I saw very little of him during the war years. Many times he would be asleep in the chair, until a knock at the door came telling him that he was needed urgently back in work as some part of the machinery had broken down.

He went to work very early in the morning and didn’t come home until very late. In foggy weather men had to walk in front of the bus with a newspaper so that the dimmed lights from the grills on the headlights could show them the way. In Winter when the buses weren’t running he had to walk to and fro work. He tried to do his bit for Tredegar and became an Air Raid Warden. I think he found it very difficult shouting at houses to ‘Put that light out’
Winters in those far off days were very cruel, yet we had some fun as well. I can remember sledging down the ‘Big Hill’ and Sgt. Evans grabbing our sledges.

I can remember the toilets at the top of the garden and all the water being frozen right throughout the house. Luckily one house wouldn’t have the pipes frozen and we queued up with our buckets and pails outside.

I can also recall the ‘Knocker Uppers’ – men employed by the pits to wake up their employees. They would come around at about 4.30 am tapping the windows to wake up the men. I also remember the Gas Lighter. Every evening he would come around lighting the gas lights on the street corners. They then introduced a wind – up mechanical lighter, but he still had to rest his ladder against the arm of the lamp each week to wind up the device.

There were few cars around in those early days – only horse and carts. Tommy Harris used to deliver the coal; Tom Jones the milk and Joey Manning the vegetables and fruit. Jones the Milk was usually accompanied by one of his sons -Trevor or young Tom. The milk was splashed out with a ladle, from the churn, directly into the jug. The boys came around at the weekend to collect the money. The old Rag and Bone man used to come around regularly, sharpening knives and repairing umbrellas. He had a flat cart and a poor horse that looked as if it had seen better days.

The coal was tipped outside your front door and had to be carried through the house to the coal shed, big lumps first and finally the small coal. Sometimes tramps from Tredegar’s Workhouse would offer to bring the coal in for sixpence. Some of the tramps had fallen on hard times and were OK, but others were quite nasty.

We walked to school each day. There was no taking us there and bringing us home. In the Infants I can remember the Headmistress – Miss Fowler. A lady as I recall not to be trifled with. She wore a black dress and was very strict.

In 1939 we were all kitted out with gas masks, which were in cardboard boxes. We had to carry them with us all the time. When the sirens went in school time we had to assemble and be marched down the road to people’s houses, until the ‘All Clear’ was sounded.

Education still had to go on and examinations had to be taken for entry into The Grammar School. Here, initially the boys and girls were segregated. The Boys and Girls even having their own entrances to the school. There was a big wall built across the play yard – boys one side and girls the other. Mr. Tidswell, an ex. Army Major ruled us with iron discipline, many times he shouted at us ‘I’ll have your guts for garters’ – I think we feared Miss Mainwaring more than him. She was five foot nothing, but she put the fear of God up us all.
In those days schools gave plenty of homework and I can remember doing my homework listening to ‘Dick Barton, Special Agent’. He must have had a good influence on me because I usually got good marks.
In the school holidays ‘our gang’ played on the Black Tips by No. pit. The remains of No. 9 was still there in those days and we used to clamber all over the winding wheel house and Gordon Bridgeman even used to clamber onto the winding wheel. One false move and he would have fallen down the open shaft.

When it was really warm we used to pay a visit to Ty-Trist hot water pond and frolic there in the nude. Unknown to us Constable Mullins would creep up and confiscate our clothes. To get our clothes back he would give us a kick up the backside and tell us if we were caught again he would tell our parents. Our parents would have been humiliated having their sons brought home in disgrace, so for months afterwards we kept away from Ty-Trist.

A great treat for me was for my father to take me down to the iron works to see an uncle – Uriah Rendall. Uriah as was his father before him, an engine driver in the works. I was so excited to pull levers to drop sand onto the rails and move the controls.

Another summer occupation was fishing with our hands in the river. Sometimes we ran foul of Inspector Reed, who would march us to the door of the Police Station and give us a good ticking off.
Sundays were special. We were washed and brushed – up and sent to Sunday School. As the Whitson Parades got nearer we used to change Sunday Schools because we were told that various establishments did better teas. On the day of the Parades we marched proudly through the town.

We used to walk miles over the mountains. As long as we came home for tea our parents didn’t seem to worry – if my grand daughters are late for any reason I’m worried sick. How times have changed.
During the war the Germans bombed Swansea and the oil terminals, for over a week the sky was red at night from the burning oil. During the raids you could see the tracer bullets flying skyward. One dark night a British aircraft lost it’s way and circled Tredegar time and time again, dropping flares until suddenly there was a huge bang. It had flown into the mountain above Reid Hall.

Tredegar once saw a Dog Fight. A Spitfire and a German fighter did battle over the town and mountain. The German was shot down and parachuted out near Trefil. The German pilot was brought to Tredegar Police Station. He must have been terrified seeing such a huge crowd which had gathered.

When the war ended in 1945 Tredegar went wild. Nearly every street held a party and there were bazooka marching bands and each street tried to out do each other. In our street – Kimberley Terrace – Billie Hayman who had just been demobbed, dressed up as a woman and it was a sight to behold.



Time passed until we had the awful weather of 1947. By this time my parents had bought another house in Kimberley Terrace. It snowed continuously until the snow was up to the bedroom window sills. The miners couldn’t get to work so they tunnelled away clearing the snow from the pavements and making an opening onto the road. Trains were stuck and when they eventually got through all supplies had to be collected from the railway station. Our sledges came in very useful then.

After sitting my G.C.E’s I did my National Service. I was stationed in Gloucestershire and came home each weekend. This changed when I was posted to Cornwall. When at home ‘our gang’ used to walk up to Tafannabach. Ivor Williams who used to work for Charles Electrical ran a Fourpenny Hop, and a half of scrumpy in the local pub used to make us feel like supermen. After the RAF service I went to Caerleon and trained to be a School Teacher. After marriage we settled in my grand mother’s house. Our first daughter was born in St. James, but as in all jobs you have to move to get promotion, so in 1960 I moved to Bristol and further moves followed.

I don’t visit Tredagar as much as I should. All my relatives are now in Cefn Golau. Once or twice a year I take my daughters and grandchildren to put flowers on their graves. Unfortunately life moves on, but my heart and thoughts are always on my home town, where I had a marvellous childhood.

Bryan Rendell








emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 27/08/2007 :  19:54:40 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi, Very much enjoyed Bryan's reflections on Tredegar in years past. I also attended (a few years earlier) what I believe became known as the Grammar school although in my day it was called The Tredegar County School. I clearly recall that the school cap, if bought from the school cost 3/9d. An identical cap, with green segments in the crown etc, but minus the initials T.C.S. in the cooperative store, (next to the "Kong" cost 1/3d which is the one I had. My school bag cost 6/6d and soccer boots 8/4d.
My Saunders was the headmaster when I attended, assisted by Wyndham Scandrett, Mr Shindler,(art) Lorraine Jones,(French)" Big Ben" and "Spider" and others. It was co-ed when I attended which came as a shock to me as I had previously attended Early St where the boys school was seperate from the girls school and the infants,(where I also attended in the good care of Miss Chambelain and Miss Butts) in the centre. After my first year at "The County School" I transferred to the technical school where Jack Sullivan was the (excellent) headmaster, assisted by W. Scandrett (who also transferred at the same time), Mr Elkins, "Buckup" Jones, Mr James, (metalwork) and Mr Joseph,(carpentry)
Hard to believe now but well up into the 1950's Tredegar had a complement of 26 police officers, most working out of the Georgetown police station and a couple working exclusively in Ashvale and Dukestown. The names of Sgt Pask, Calder,Reed and (Detective) Barnstable all come to mind. All walked the beat and all were adept at swinging their capes at anyone reluctant to move on when told to do so. Very little real crime in the town in those days and every store on Commercial St, was equipped with a canvas awning rather than the steel shutters now almost mandatory. I don't recall a plane coming down near Georgetown or about a German pilot in custody at the police station.However I clearly recall the Whitworth Whitely bomber that crash landed very close to the road near Trefil. I and two others were able to get very close to the plane and grabbed various bits and pieces but we were caught by the police on the site and most, (but not all ) of our "souvenirs" were confiscated, we were suitably admonished, threatened with a trip to Quakers Yard ( the local reformitory for boys) and finally told to "bugger off'."
I remember Ivor Williams and his lovely wife who taught,(or tried hard to teach me) how to dance at Tafaunabach hop. I believe that after that they became the landlords at the Tredegar Arms. I recall also being served half pints, (never a pint) either at the Prince of wales or the Travellers rest. We used to call the drinks,"bolters" because we were forced to drink fast. I clearly remember at one of these pubs the landlord ( an Irish man) would serve us then almost immediately would say, " drink up boys the cops are outside' Then, after we had "bolted" the last drop he would reappear and say, "all clear boys the cops gone, same again?"
Some will disagree but personally I like to keep one foot in the past and savour the rich memories of growing up in Tredegar.
Emrys.
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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 27/08/2007 :  21:50:16 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Emrys
Enjoyed the trip back in time memories I cherish, although I was a few years behind you I can relate to all. I think you and Brian are wrong about where the plane crashed I can recall it being Hawthornes Farm above the Mile Pond, there was police on guard and the pilot was taken to Maindiff Court where Hess was also held
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 28/08/2007 :  10:02:54 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Emrys and Morgan,

I enjoyed your little trip down memory lane Emrys. I remember we had to wear caps all the time and doff them to staff we met outside school.I also remember the satchels we had to carry our books in. We had many a fight with them.
Some of the staff you mention were in school whilst I was there:
'Chuck' Edwards - maths; Dickie Dye - chemistry; Mr. James - woodwork; Len Scandrett - English. Bonzo Griffiths - Geography. Owen his son organises the Grammar School reunion each year. In fact the reunion will be this Saturday at Reid Hall. Len Scandrett died about 15 years ago but before he died he wrote two books on Tredegar.
I've looked up 'The Wellington Aviation Museum' and found that on:

25th april, whilst on night exercises an Anson crashes near Tredegar. The aircraft was destroyed and one of the crew sustained a broken leg. All the crew were taken back to Moreton-in- the Marsh by road

This must be the one I can recall flying around dropping flares.

I've looked for information on 'The Dog Fight'., but haven't come up with anything as yet. I was told at the time the German plane crashed near Trefil. I distinctly remember the pilot being brought to Georgetown Police Station.
Probably you are correct saying it crashed near The Mile Pond.

Do you remember friends of mine David Nevins, Tony Coles and Michael Cadwallider at Tredegar Technical School.

Bryan




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emrys
Advanced Member

715 Posts

Posted - 28/08/2007 :  15:51:29 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Hi, Morgan and Bryan. I've been away for more than 52 years but to the best of my recollection going from Pen y Bont to Trefil there was only one house on the left side. It was behind that house that Whitley bomber landed so yes it would have been north of the Shoncheffries reservoir but nowhere near the mile pond, then owned by Gus Samuels. By the time I and my "accomplices" arrived as well as some police officers there were some members of the Home Guard in attendance (may have been the LDV at that time). It was a moonlit night with some clouds and the plane looked in fairly good shape except that the fuselarge had partially seperated. We probably were able to get right to the plane because of the number of people about and intermittent moonlight. The officer we had to "surrender" our souvenirs to was, I believe, a special constable becuse he had a peaked cap. I was still able to hide portions of what must have been navigational charts as various stars and constellations were shown. I kept it for many years and it might even be still in the house where I lived. My "accomplices" at the time were Roy Williams , (died in Australia) who lived with his grandparents, the Millers (next to the Gem at the end of Commercial St)and Gwn Jones,(died in Blaenavon) who lived with his grandmother on High St.
I never knew what happened to the crew of the aircraft.
I expect you will have been informed by now Bryan that the Scandrett who was a teacher and wrote two books was Wyndham Scandrett who lived on Rawlinson Terrace. Wyndham by himself, produced a play in the Workmens Hall, named "Out of the Furnace" all about the starting of the iron and steel development in Wales, a very dramatic presentation. He was also the leader of the St James Drama group, at a time when we had had five amateur dramatic societys in Tredegar, all of whom won many awards. I had a lot to do with Wyndham after my school years. He was a magistrate for 29 years ( but luckily I never had dealings with him in that capacity.) Growing up in Tredegar during the war was a marvellous time for boys, double summer time which made the days much longer, and (in memory at least) endless summers. I always felt a bit sorry for girls at that time, yes they had their dolls and domestic science etc but they didn't seem to have the same freedom or imagination as us. We, as boys were free to roam ,could become Errol Flynn or Robin Hood etc instantly,and have the same adventures as we saw regularly in the Workmens Hall or the "lymp.
One question: Was the Grammar school originally the County School ?? and if so why the change? and why the name Grammar??
The names you mention Bryan were not known to me but I suspect were a little younger and behind me at the Technical school
Emrys.
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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 28/08/2007 :  19:09:57 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Emrys & Brian
You will find that I am correct regarding the plane crash at Hawthornes Farm, a dingy was found in the mile pond as the pilot tried to bail out before crashing, the 2nd crash did so take place this was on the old Firing Range just above Tynewydd so you are correct on those facts.
Yes Brian I was in the Tech being in the same Form as Tony Coles, Colin Beecher, Charlie Mac, Haydn and Ken Williams a great bunch of mates.

Regards Morgan
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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 28/08/2007 :  23:14:36 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Brian
I know its out of context enjoy your reunion on Saturday
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 29/08/2007 :  10:03:05 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Again Emrys and Morgan,

Thanks for your replies and thanks Morgan for wishing me a good time at Reid hall on Saturday.
Our numbers, unfortunately are getting less each year. Hopefully about 35/40 of us will attend. With the drinking and driving it's going to be a pint of shandy as I will have to drive back to Chepstow afterwards.
Colin Beacher and Charlie Mac. were good friends. Charlie Mac. - what a character!! I'm told that these days he is crippled with rheumatism.
We are gathering at 7 pm on Saturday. Last year Ron. Hunt turned up to wish us all well.
John Fear and his brother live in Sedbury, just down the road from Chepstow, so I see them quite often.
Many Tredegar people live in Chepstow and Caldicot. They moved down when Llanwern was built.

I have sent Pierre two other pieces on 'My Memories of Tredegar' plus old photos of Tredegar Grammar School pupils - 1945/46 and 1954/55.

Hopefully he will post them soon.

Best regards,
Bryan
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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 29/08/2007 :  15:09:58 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bryan
Don`t know if you are aware that Colin Beecher and Charlie are both deceased. Say hello to John Fear for me, better known to him as Danny I often wondered what had become of him.
Regards Morgan
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 29/08/2007 :  16:19:40 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Morgan,

I wasn't aware that Colin and Charlie had died. I'll find out on Saturday if the 'Gang' knew this?

Some good news, Emrys and Morgan - have a look at Tredegar Cholera Cemetery and the letter I've posted from Frank Olding.

Let's hope it happens in my lifetime.

Bryan

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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 29/08/2007 :  18:53:38 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bryan
Thats a brilliant peace of news, what a turn up I wasn`t aware that Tredegar Rural Estates exsisted.
On the subject of the deceased your old friend Keith
[Tuppence ] whom you will be seeing on saturday at the Rhyd Hall will verify.

Regards Morgan
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 17/09/2007 :  21:35:12 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
GORDON BRIDGEMAN.

It's a small World

I was at a Chepstow Comprehensive School Governor's Meeting this evening when a member of the Governors said he had read my article on The Cholera Cemetery.

It turned out that he was Gordon Bridgeman's son. We had a good old chat about Tredegar and he told me that his dad had died over a year ago.

Gordon and I only lived a few doors away from each other in Kimberley Terrace and were great mates when we were young.

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davidmorgan
Full Member

36 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2011 :  23:34:23 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bryan Rendell

GORDON BRIDGEMAN.

It's a small World

I was at a Chepstow Comprehensive School Governor's Meeting this evening when a member of the Governors said he had read my article on The Cholera Cemetery.

It turned out that he was Gordon Bridgeman's son. We had a good old chat about Tredegar and he told me that his dad had died over a year ago.

Gordon and I only lived a few doors away from each other in Kimberley Terrace and were great mates when we were young.



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davidmorgan
Full Member

36 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2011 :  23:58:21 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bryan,

For some reason, your name 'rings bells'in my brain.

The Bethel Avenue kids were more adventurous, they actually lowered the younger siblings partially down the No 9 Shaft, throwing the rope after them! I can remember running home, screaming this fact, to the parents in Bethel Avenue!

Skating on the ice of the 'Dead Dogs Pond' - or any of the vast numbers of water features - chasing the bubbles below the ice!

Some of the ventilation features were interesting, simply six feet above ground, and, sheer drops to Hell below! We spent fascinating times hurling bottles to their warbling doom, down those shafts.

The worst really were the bangers dropped down No9, timed to detonate the Marsh Gas at the bottom, and the flash, followed by the delayed goat of warm air. Yes, the kids were climbing the main winding wheel, making it rotate, all above the open shaft. Can you imagine being a parent in those times?

Of course, these days, I can hardly recognise a single feature. Stop for a drink of water at a natural spring, on the way to 'Weavers Farm' and very close to my old No 4 working, forget it. The slag heaps have gone, the levelers have done their thing, we have the most fragile of memories, soon to disappear for good.

For all that, what a magnificent way to spend a childhood?












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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 18/02/2011 :  08:09:09 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks David,

I used to be very friendly with Bruce Macpherson's sons. Also I think a relative of mine lived in Bethel Avenue - Barbara Durham. She was a lovely looking girl with beautiful ringlets.

For Morgan ---- John Fear died a few weeks ago from Cancer.
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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 18/02/2011 :  15:14:45 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Brian
So sorry to hear of the Death of John, I have some good memories of our school days, I will pass the sad news on.

R.I.P John

morgan

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Titch
Advanced Member

United Kingdom
520 Posts

Posted - 22/02/2011 :  20:12:53 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Hi Boys

as a matter of interest was John Fear related to Fears the Bakery (Based adjacent to the Greyhound on Lower Coronation St). His mother and father lived in the detached house in front of the Con Club in Church St. Or is it a different family entirely?





I love a Black Bush!
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morgan.m
Super Member

1184 Posts

Posted - 22/02/2011 :  23:28:11 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Titch
John lived in Whitworth Terrace and he was related to Fears the Bakery
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 22/02/2011 :  23:36:31 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John's father - Milton Fear was a moulder in Tredegar Iron Works. His brother was Reg Fear the baker. Reg lived in Church Street. If my memory serves me correctly John's mother had a small shop in Bridge Street.
Reg. had a daughter and son. The daughter was paralysed. I think her name was Marilyn
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fredd
Super Member

6208 Posts

Posted - 22/02/2011 :  23:53:22 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bryan I would just like to say i was with some of your Old friends today , The Provini's..!!
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 23/02/2011 :  09:25:35 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Didn't Frank take over a cafe in Cefn Coed, Merthyr Tydfil after his father died. Other names I remember were Gloria and the love of my life - Maria.

A friend of mine - Graham Healey - married Rosa, a cousin of the Provinins. Sadly Graham died a year last November, leaving his widow and a daughter who lives in America.

When you see them again please give my my warmest greetings and thank them for the wonderful times we all had together when they ran the cafe at the top of Bridge Street, all those years ago.

Edited by - Bryan Rendell on 23/02/2011 09:27:37
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fredd
Super Member

6208 Posts

Posted - 23/02/2011 :  13:56:27 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Bryan , I'm Still Trying to work it all out, as You can imagine it Must have been hard work 60ish years ago, I spoke to Frankie and Gloria yesterday Frankie did have a cafe in Cefn Coed and numerous others including Fish and Chip shops and ice cream vans etc,....... Gloria told Me that she was born in the Circle Cafe and then much later they moved down to the Park cafe and said they were good times !!....Apparently Mino is in His campervan in morocco at the moment, ......Unfortunatly Irene passed away about ten years ago.....and Edna Maria passed away last september !! I will see what else I can find / work out..!!
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fredd
Super Member

6208 Posts

Posted - 27/02/2011 :  18:06:46 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"Other names I remember were Gloria and the love of my life - Maria."
Hello again Bryan , I was in the company of Gloria and Maria in Tredegar earlier today , Maria now lives in Italy , Gloria is living in Merthyr , I Did get a Cracking Old Photo off them Showing Maria and Irene in the Circle Cafe
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Bryan Rendell
Super Member

United Kingdom
1787 Posts

Posted - 27/02/2011 :  18:18:10 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Evening Fredd,

Do you think you could E mail me a copy of your photo.

Regards

Bryan
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fredd
Super Member

6208 Posts

Posted - 27/02/2011 :  18:26:45 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry Bryan but i havent got a scanner Maybe you should ask Pierre !!
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pierre
Webmaster

United Kingdom
13780 Posts

Posted - 27/02/2011 :  22:03:27 Link directly to this reply  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, Fredd has come up with the goods

Right, anybody got any names and year ?



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